2012 A Year To Remember In Marijuana Reform

Discussion in 'Legalization/Decriminalization' started by Monterey Bud, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. Monterey Bud Monterey Bud

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    • Since: Nov 16, 2011
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    By Major Neill Franklin (Ret.), Executive Director, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition
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    2012 has been an unprecedented year for drug policy reformers. We were victorious in securing full legalization of marijuana in Colorado and Washington State, and the coming months will reveal models of legalization taking shape.

    Massachusetts became the eighteenth state to legalize medical marijuana. Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina called for drug legalization in Central America and beyond. Victims of the drug war in Mexico and the United States came together and spoke out for reform during the Caravan for Peace with Justice and Dignity. Cops and moms across the United States joined together to call for an end to the war on drugs.

    Law Enforcement Against Prohibition was there every step of the way, and we are so proud to have been a driving force behind this incredible progress. To top off an already amazing year, LEAP celebrated significant milestones of our own in 2012, marking our tenth anniversary and initiating our official LEAP membership program. We wouldn’t have made it this far without your support. In the spirit of the season, please enjoy this short musical holiday greeting from LEAP.

    We’ve come a long way over the years, and 2012 has been proof that our perseverance is paying off in the form of true, tangible change. LEAP’s speakers and staff are among the most dedicated and capable people I know, and we stand ready to expand our efforts and exceed your expectations. To do that, we need your help. Please make a contribution to LEAP today and stand with these courageous law enforcers who bring such credibility and integrity to the fight against drug prohibition. LEAP has big plans for 2013 – your support keeps our doors open and helps us to open new doors for drug policy reform.
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