Canadian Mental Health Association Wants Restrictions on Pot

2

While licensed producers of cannabis in Canada lobby the government for leniency on product advertising, the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) has taken the opposite approach.

In a report released Monday, the Ontario division of the CMHA provided various recommendations to the Ontario government regarding adult-use marijuana regulations. One of these suggestions was a restriction on advertising like those placed on the tobacco industry.

“The risk is that legalization of cannabis may lead to an increase in use among Ontarians,” said Camille Quenneville, CEO of CMHA in a news release.

Colorado: State Survey Shows Marijuana Use Drops Among Teens After Legalization

Colorado: State Survey Shows Marijuana Use Drops Among Teens After Legalization

Among the list of recommendations is a “zero tolerance” policy on using marijuana in any motorized vehicle for drivers or passengers. The CMHA also proposed that the minimum age in Ontario should be 19 and those who distribute legal pot be required to engage in a cannabis education program. This program would be similar to the Smart Serve course that is mandatory for anyone serving alcohol.

As well, the report recommended that some revenue from marijuana sales be earmarked to fund mental health and addiction services as well as public awareness campaigns. Education on cannabis should begin “as early as possible” for children and have “age appropriate content.”

The report also wants the establishment of a regulatory agency such as a “cannabis control board” to issue proper permits for the sale and consumption of pot.

“More research needs to occur about the impact of cannabis on a young person’s development,” said Quenneville.

All Canadian provinces are currently in the process of creating their individual frameworks for the impending sale of adult-use cannabis scheduled for July 2018.

About Author

Jonathan Hiltz has been a journalist, a TV producer and marijuana advocate for over sixteen years. He has a wife, two young children and lives in the Toronto area.

2 Comments

  1. Excellent example of the hypocricy currently running through the ranks of federal policy-makers and stakeholders in the CDN MJ-legalization end-game. Why no “guidelines,” insisted upon by the CMA, about the risks alcohol abuse poses to developing adolescent brain structures???

    Of course the CMA wants to ramp up restrictions! They’re direct beneficiaries of Big Pharma who, like Big Booze, stand to lose the most by legalization for recreational purposes in Canada.

    Next up: “The risk is that legalization of cannabis may lead to an increase in use among Ontarians,” is not a risk at all, Camille, but a direct result of legalization.

    “Among the list of recommendations is a “zero tolerance” policy on using marijuana in any motorized vehicle for drivers or passengers. The CMHA also proposed that the minimum age in Ontario should be 19 and those who distribute legal pot be required to engage in a cannabis education program.” Sorry Jon, but no evidence is currently available that convincingly illustrates that THC/CBD-balanced pot poses a risk to anyone, nor is there sufficient risk modeling illustrative of increased risk to drivers/pedestrians/passengers due to cannabis intoxification.

    Scientists have learned that cannabinoid receptor signalling—endogenously, herbally (with MJ!), or synthetically—also regulates adult neurogenesis (brain cell growth) and stem cell migration [Dr. J. McPartland, “The Endocannabinoid System: An Osteopathic Perspective” Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 108(10), 2008] (214, Smoke Signals by Martin A. Lee).

    A major function of the endocannabinoid system—and therefore a significant effect of the cannabinoids in MJ—is neuroprotective in nature: protecting brain cells from too much excitation. Thus, the endocannabinoid system is part of the body’s general protective network, working in conjunction with the immune system and various other pathological systems [R. Mechoulam et al., “Cannabinoids and Brain Injury: Therapeutic Implications” TRENDS in Molecular Medicine 8(2), 2002].

    A German research team has demonstrated that CB-2 receptor activation restrains the formation of bone reabsorbing cells known as osteoclasts, by down-regulating osteoclast precursors, thus tipping the scale in favour of osteoblasts, cells that facilitate bone formation.

    Get the picture? Big Pharma doesn’t want MJ to return to its primadonna position in the folk remedy medicine cabinet. Getting a little fed up with Hiltz blithely quoting these corporate A-holes without any critical reflection. C’mon, Jon! Let’s see some more research!!!!

  2. The Ontario division of the CMHA should provide proof that there is a need for more research before the roll out of legalization. Research is needed but not for prohibition but for efficacy in medical use.

Leave A Reply