California Lawmakers Are Deep in the Weeds With Marijuana Bills | Marijuana

California Lawmakers Are Deep in the Weeds With Marijuana Bills

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California’s legislators are scheduled to hold 10 hearings on proposed cannabis legislation during the week of May 14, 2018.

California’s Senate Appropriations Committee will be buzzing with legislative activity Monday. At 10 a.m. in the John L. Burton Hearing Room in the Capitol in Sacramento, the committee will debate legislation addressing intoxicated driving, equal opportunity for disadvantaged groups, industrial hemp cultivation, and underage sales. Many lawmakers around the country are winding down their legislative process as they prepare for summer recess, but there’s no rest for California lawmakers  — at least this week.

California

A law that would make it an infraction for drivers and passengers to use marijuana in motor vehicles was scheduled for a hearing at 10 a.m. Monday, May 14, 2018, before the Senate Appropriations Committee. Introduced by state Sen. Jerry Hill, SB 1273 would also make it an infraction for those younger than 21 to have “any detectable quantity of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in his or her body.”

SB 1294, a bill to create greater parity in the cannabis application process for people of color, women, low-income individuals, veterans, and individuals with criminal records was scheduled to receive a hearing at 10 a.m. on Monday, May 14, 2018, before the Senate Appropriations Committee. The bill would require the Bureau of Cannabis Control to establish a cannabis equity task force. The bill would require the bureau to assist state and local equity applicants and licensees with gaining access to reduced-interest and interest-free loans, and grants effective Jan. 1, 2019.

SB 1409 would change the definition of industrial hemp under the California Uniform Controlled Substance Act to a fiber or oilseed crop. The bill, introduced by Republican state Sen. Scott Wilk has received bipartisan support and would also delete the requirements that industrial hemp seed cultivators be certified before January 1, 2013, in order to be included on the list of approved cultivators. The industrial hemp bill was scheduled to receive a hearing at 10 a.m. Monday, May 14, 2018, before the Senate Appropriations Committee.

SB 1451, would impose penalties on a licensed marijuana retailer who sells or furnishes cannabis-related products to individuals younger than 21. Sponsored by state Sen. Jean Fuller, SB 1451 was scheduled for a hearing at 10 a.m. on Monday, May 14, 2018, before the Senate Appropriations Committee.

AB 710 would amend the California Uniform Controlled Sub to allow Californians to use and possess cannabidiol (CBD) when federal law will permit it. Introduced by Democratic Assembly member Jim Wood, the bill was scheduled to receive a hearing at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 15, 2018, before the Senate Appropriations Committee.

For business owners, AB 1863 would allow state compliant California cannabis cultivation businesses to deduct business expenses in the calculation of their personal income taxes. Introduced by Democratic Assembly member Rob Bonta, the bill, which would take effect immediately after it’s enacted,  was scheduled to receive a hearing at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 16, 2018, before the Assembly Appropriations Committee in State Capitol Room 4202.

The Medical Cannabis Worker Protections Act, AB 2069, was introduced also by Bonta, drafted to include medical cannabis patients in the protections offered for pharmaceutical prescriptions. The bill was scheduled to receive a hearing at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 16, 2018, before the Assembly Appropriations Committee in State Capitol Room 4202.

AB 2525 proposes to authorize the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to survey illegal cannabis cultivation on public lands and eradicate unauthorized cultivation sites. Sponsored by Assembly member Wood, the proposed bill is scheduled to receive a hearing at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 16, 2018 before the Assembly Appropriations Committee in State Capitol Room 4202.

A bill that would allow the California Bureau of Cannabis Control and Licensing to issue temporary event licenses for cannabis at county fairs and district agricultural events was scheduled to receive a hearing at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 16, 2018 before the Assembly Appropriations Committee in State Capitol Room 4202. AB 2641, introduced Assembly member Jim Wood, is aimed at giving cultivators the chance to sell directly to consumers on a limited basis during a fair or similar event.

AB 3157 proposes to suspend the cultivation tax rate for the first three years. Introduced by Assembly member Bonta, the bill was scheduled to receive a hearing at 9 a.m. Wednesday,

About Author

My name is Monterey Bud and I was born in Long Beach and raised on the central coast. I surf, dab, burn and write. I'm a husband, a father and a lifelong consumer of connoisseur grade weed. I have been writing about marijuana strains, science, and politics for Marijuana.com since 2012. A Big Sur cultivator from the pre-helicopter days, I'm a big fan of new strains and breaking news. I can be reached on Twitter @MontereyBud

1 Comment

  1. How about a bill that makes it so cities and counties CANNOT rewrite the law to prohibit citizens from growing outdoors or in a green house. My city banned greenhouse grows as well as outdoor grows. In order to grow here you need to have a completely inclosed detached building with air filtration so people don’t complain about the smell. It discriminates against people who need access to weed but who cannot afford to build a grow house. My city has made it so that only a select few can actually grow weed here, which violates the very nature of the law and opens the door for big money to form monopolies. How about making it so I can actually get a permit to cultivate so I can start doing things the legal way and paying taxes. I’m sitting on prime product that I can’t move because I cannot get a license to cultivate in my city. Until they fix this botched law, we are at risk of a massive shortage by this coming winter. Until they fix the law so that EVERYBODY has an equal chance at doing things the legal way, the black market will continue to thrive and undercut the legal market, which is exactly why tax revenue fell short, and will continue to fall short.

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